Category Archives: Devotional

Water and Light

IMG_0195Oh spring!

I love planting things in the spring and watching them grow over the summer.  This winter I became infatuated with the idea of growing lima beans; a vegetable plant I’ve never grown before.

Recently, my wife and I located a package of seeds at a garden store.  At the time it was way too early in the spring to plant them outdoors so we decided to replicate the experiment I did as a child at school.  Do you remember putting bean seeds in a glass of water with a paper towel stuffed in it to keep the seeds upright?

Handling the seeds, I was amazed at how hard and, well, dead-looking they were.  As you can see from the photo, we were successful at our experiment and one of them is now potted and awaits it’s final transplant in our garden.  (The other seed is going back in the glass of water.)

This fun project reminded me of how important life-giving water and light are to bring what appears to be a dead, dried up seed back to life.  We all need water and light to have abundant life.

Jesus replied, “Anyone who drinks this water will soon become thirsty again.  But those who drink the water I give will never be thirsty again.  It becomes a fresh, bubbling spring within them, giving them eternal life.”  John 4:13-14 NLT
He rescues them from the grave so they may enjoy the light of life. Job 33:30 NLT

 

 

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Joshua 7: Devoted things

victorian-2745_960_720Fresh off their victory over Jericho, the Israelites walked through the ruins of the city, marveling over how the mighty walls of Jericho fell as they shouted. Did thoughts such as, “We are God’s chosen no one can stand against us” creep into their heads?

As their pride swelled, trouble followed. Joshua chapter 7 recalls the second battle led by Joshua; one against Ai, which means “the ruin.” They assumed defeating Ai would be a much easier task than the battle of a heavily fortified Jericho. God wasn’t consulted on how the battle against Ai should be fought. As a result, a smaller but sufficient force set out to do battle. They were soundly defeated.

The Israelites were perplexed. Why did God allow this to happen? The hearts of the Israelites melted with fear! If word got out of their defeat, all of Canaan would descend on the Israelites and wipe them out.

As it turns out God was angry with the Israelites.  He revealed the reason for this anger to Joshua. The Israelites were not supposed to take any of the spoils of Jericho for themselves but someone did. Joshua began questioning the people, tribe by tribe, family by family. Achan from the tribe of Judah was the culprit. He buried some of the spoils devoted to God in the dirt under his tent. His words are unforgettable, “I saw them…I coveted them…I took them.” He and his family paid the ultimate price for his disobedience.

“I saw them…I coveted them…I took them.” Joshua 7:21

D. R. Davis shares this insight, “Our problem here is- sinners that we are – we don’t think breaking Yahweh’s covenant is all that big a deal.” We don’t understand the presence of sin and how it affects our relationship with a holy God.

Another thought to consider is the idea of “serpent theology” found in Genesis 3:1. The serpent’s temptation placed the emphasis on the one thing God restricted rather than all the blessings we already hold in our hands.

“Give us this day our daily bread… and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from the evil one.” Matthew 6:11, 13

He is Risen!

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Easter is sometimes called resurrection Sunday.  Belief in a bodily resurrection extends clear back to the time of Abraham.  Job, a contemporary of Abraham, had this to say:

“For I know that my Redeemer lives, And He shall stand at last on the earth; And after my skin is destroyed, this I know, That in my flesh I shall see God.”  Job 19:25-26

Today, the hope of a bodily resurrection remains the greatest single desire for those who wish to live beyond the grave; to have their slate wiped clean of heartaches, defects and maladies; to once again be able to converse with lost friends and loved ones.  How can we be sure there will be a bodily resurrection for every believer in Jesus Christ?  The gospel of John records these words of Jesus just before the bodily resurrection of Lazarus:

Jesus said to her [Martha], “I am the resurrection and the life.  The one who believes in me will live, even though they die…”  John 11:25

Be of good courage!

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Wait for the LORD;
be strong, and let your heart take courage;
wait for the LORD!

Psalm 27:14 ESV

Where I Am

9781511300162I am told Where I am is the last book written by Billy Graham.  I decided to read this book after being reminded of the one year anniversary of his death. The book features short chapters encompassing the whole of Scripture, beginning with Genesis and continuing on to Revelation. In classic fashion, Graham gives insights into discovering who God is and covers subjects such as heaven and eternity.

Along the way, the book offers a concise history of the human race. Graham highlights each human life has a choice of two paths, to pursue one’s own selfish path leading to destruction or accept God’s gift of deliverance and follow the path leading to eternal life.

Graham’s book speaks often about death and life in the hereafter. It’s 36 chapters and wealth of scripture makes the book an excellent devotional. I found it to be an uplifting read.

Joshua 6: Fighting the battle of Jericho

temple-3416958_960_720The gates to Jericho were closed. No one could get in or go out. Jericho’s massive walls towered over the entrance to the Promised Land. The people of Israel looked at the situation, realizing the hopelessness of it.  Contrary to the song I sang as a child, God, not Joshua fought the battle of Jericho.

“And the Lord said to Joshua, See, I have given into your hands Jericho with its king and all its men of war.” Joshua 6:2

The people circled the city daily in silence as instructed by God, carrying the Ark of the Covenant before them. On the seventh day the people blew horns and shouted.  Who would believe the massive walls of the city could simply fall down unless they were there to witness it. Have you ever wondered what the people shouted? Perhaps it was hallelujah, which in Hebrew means a joyous praise; to boast in God.

Rahab and her family were the only ones spared from destruction. The plunder of the fallen city was dedicated to God. Could the people resist putting some of the glittering silver and gold lying among the stones into their pockets?  (Stay tuned for the answer.)

Spiritually speaking, we build evil fortresses like Jericho in our hearts. We wall off certain areas of our lives we wish to protect from God’s control. Only after these fortresses fall can abundant life be experienced. Freedom comes with letting go, not reinforcing our fortresses.