Tag Archives: What to read

If I Run

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If I Run is the first book in the latest series by Terri Blackstock.  I have enjoyed a number of her fiction novels in the past.  This book doesn’t disappoint.

The story opens with Casey Cox fleeing the murder scene of her friend.  Evidence at the scene points to her.  When the police find the murder weapon in Casey’s car, she becomes the primary suspect.  The victim’s parents hire Dylan Roberts, a childhood friend of the deceased to find the killer.  While in hiding, Casey risks revealing her identity when she becomes involved in solving a child kidnapping case.  Did Casey kill her friend?  Will Dylan find Casey? If Casey didn’t kill her friend then who did?

This is a great read with revelation after revelation revealed as the story unfolds.

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The Gap is not a Theory!

51wiLF+hvNL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Occasionally I read a book to satisfy my curiosity or learn something more about a particular subject that interests me.  This is one of those great and informative reads.  The Gap is not a Theory! by Jack W. Langford seeks to tackle the issue of a possible time gap found in the opening chapter in the book of Genesis.  For the longest time I have suspected that those who claim the universe is billions of years old and those who believe the earth as we know it is only thousands of years old could both be right.  There are scientific measurements supporting both claims.

In this book the author lays out the case the heavens and earth were created (Genesis 1:1) long before the six day creation account beginning in Genesis 1:3.  The earth at some point in its past “became” formless and void (Genesis 1:2) as the result of a judgment of some kind.  It is proposed this judgment had to do with the fall of Lucifer (Satan).  I found this to be a fascinating study supported by scripture.  At times the discussion of scripture translations from the original Hebrew became laborious to read but the result was rewarding nonetheless.  Langford includes other arguments both for and against the Genesis gap.  

I came away from this read with my faith strengthened and deepened.  It is reassuring to know that the Holy Scriptures are still relevant and in harmony the discoveries of modern science.

Where I Am

9781511300162I am told Where I am is the last book written by Billy Graham.  I decided to read this book after being reminded of the one year anniversary of his death. The book features short chapters encompassing the whole of Scripture, beginning with Genesis and continuing on to Revelation. In classic fashion, Graham gives insights into discovering who God is and covers subjects such as heaven and eternity.

Along the way, the book offers a concise history of the human race. Graham highlights each human life has a choice of two paths, to pursue one’s own selfish path leading to destruction or accept God’s gift of deliverance and follow the path leading to eternal life.

Graham’s book speaks often about death and life in the hereafter. It’s 36 chapters and wealth of scripture makes the book an excellent devotional. I found it to be an uplifting read.

A Heartbeat Away

{28D833CC-BD09-4475-B8F0-B0439C21365C}Img400It’s time for another book review.  This one, A Heartbeat Away, is written by one of my favorite authors, Dr. Harry Kraus.  He is a surgeon who serves as a medical missionary to East Africa.

“A novel is way too long of a project to write simply for entertainment.  Don’t hear me wrong! I think entertainment is important; if I can’t capture and entertain, no reader will hang in there to the end.  But in the process, I hope that a small message of hope, faith, or grace is absorbed.” Dr. Harry Kraus

The story follows the life of a surgeon Dr. Tori Taylor whose cold, unforgiving demeanor and perfectionism toward her colleagues and nursing staff makes her and island.  Still, her work is outstanding and she is well-respected.

Tori maintains complete control of her life, that is, until a virus attacks her heart, making a heart transplant imperative for her to survive.  Once the transplant procedure is complete she begins having vivid dreams, so real she believes she is witnessing some horrid event.  But these are someone else’s memories not hers.

Kraus introduces two teenage lovers seemingly unrelated to the plot and the two separate story lines race along in parallel.  Are they connected some how?  Once Tori begins receiving warnings and threats to cease pursuing the identity of her heart donor, she realizes the dreams are memories to witnessed murder.

Kraus does not let the reader relax at any point in the story.  Several late plot twists keep the reader guessing until the last pages.  Dr. Kraus’ experience as a medical surgeon adds authenticity to the writing.  This is a must read for anyone interested in fiction, murder mysteries or dramas with a medical theme!

The Knowledge of the Holy: part 1

IMG_0057I look forward to summer for a variety of reasons.  A favorite reason, I get a chance to catch up on my reading.  This summer a neighbor lent me the book, “The Knowledge of the Holy,” by A. W. Tozer.  Its an older book whose content is timeless.

One of the first things I noticed about the writing of A. W. Tozer is how large his  vocabulary is.  That being said he says he writes for the common man.  The material is very rich in both ideas and content.  I found myself rereading each chapter to absorb the full meaning of what is being said.  That shouldn’t discourage anyone from reading this book.

The main idea Tozer is trying to convey is Christians have lost their perspective on the holiness of God.

In the opening chapter he defines idolatry:

“Among the sins to which the human heart is prone, hardly any is more hateful to God than idolatry…Idolatry substitutes for the true God one made after its own likeness.”

Just in case we rush to rationalize away idolatry as described in the Bible, believing it doesn’t apply to twentieth century Christians, he writes:

“Let us beware lest we in our pride accept the erroneous notion that idolatry consists only in kneeling before visible objects of adoration, and that civilized peoples are therefore free from it.”

Tozer summarizes idolatry this way.  The essence of idolatry is the entertainment of thoughts about God that are unworthy of him.  Idols, then, can be fashioned not only with our hands but in our hearts as well.

The first step down the slippery slope of idolatry occurs when we surrender our high opinion of God.  When we believe God can tolerant sin, that the holy scriptures lack relevance in today’s culture, we rob God of his holiness.

To be continued…